landscape

Lee Copen

I paint fleeting moments of beauty found in the landscape. It is not that beauty is rare, I believe the opposite is true, every moment is beautiful but it is also always changing. My art is an attempt at capturing that moment before it is gone.  I am especially inspired by skies, water and trees. I love to paint outside whenever possible, because all of your senses are involved in the experience.  In the studio I work from sketches and photographs. I paint with both oils and watercolors depending on my mood and the circumstances.

Penny Gordon-Chumbley

As an observer of and a participant in the natural world, I cannot help but react with wonder, amusement, joy and curiosity to what I see and experience. These reactions compel me to paint from the heart, not with a historical or objective eye. As a result, my paintings become imagined settings, conveying feelings about a particular time and place or about the gifts of the earth. Unapologetically, I also react to places and objects through the lens of faith, a faith in a loving, actively involved creator.

John Whytock

~ Beauty, like truth, exists. And we, as human beings, have an almost divine capacity to recognize it. Art, for me, is an expression in paint of what my heart feels when my eyes are opened to the vast and amazing splendor of creation. In spite of the myriad struggles and changes on the path of a career artist, this one unchanging fact remains: I paint because if I didn't, my heart might explode. When a kindred spirit is touched while viewing my painting and feels that same infilling, that same indescribable longing and appreciation for our marvelous world, I consider that work a success.

Jodie Sutton

I'm excited to share with you my collection of work titled “Exploration.” These pieces reflect the various stages of my three-year journey in encaustic painting. After a long break from the fine arts, I found myself needing to disconnect from the daily barrage of technology. So, I taught myself the basics of encaustics and I began experimenting in photo encaustics. I soon transitioned into abstract landscapes and nonrepresentational pieces. I enjoy exploring the texture, translucent quality, and fluidity that can be achieved through the medium.

Mary Ellen Chiles

I walked with a friend in the North Cascades in Washington, and I tugged on his arm. “Don’t you see the way the light looks like someone dunked that mountain into an aquarium?” I said. “Don’t you see we’re lucky?” But I feel that way when I notice twigs on the sidewalk or sunlight on a doorknob. So I took photos and I wrote a little bit about people I met. I worked and traveled, and I didn’t try very hard to publish or sell what I did. Then I hit my head on an icy hill in Washington, and I decided I better start trying.